Category Archives: Oral Health

  • Choosing the Right Mouth Rinse

    A short detour down the dental care aisle at your local store could take awhile if you’re looking for mouth rinses. You may find dozens of products to choose from, all promising to protect your teeth and gums and freshen your breath, and even more. But how do you know what to believe, and which one is right […]

  • What We Can Learn From Diabetic Mice

    If you’ve got diabetes, you probably already know that diabetes can take a toll on your teeth and gums. There is a well-established connection between diabetes, tooth decay, and gum disease. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar, which results in high blood sugar levels. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk […]

  • If Your Teeth Could Talk

    Are your teeth trying to tell you something? Maybe your gums are sore, your smile is a bit yellow, or a tooth is looking a little crooked. These could be small problems, or signs that you need to see a professional. An achy tooth Do you have throbbing or achy tooth pain? If it just […]

  • You May Not Know About This, But You Should.

    A whopping 62% of Americans know very little or nothing about oral cancer, yet the death rate for this cancer is higher than that of cancers which we hear about routinely, such as cervical cancer, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, laryngeal cancer, cancer of the testes, and endocrine system cancers. A few more facts you may not know (but […]

  • Cosmetics: Making Your Smile More Beautiful

    Have you ever looked in the mirror, and wished you could make improvements on your smile? Periodontal therapy includes cosmetic procedures,  called Periodontal Plastic Procedures, that can often make great improvements. Patients young and old can benefit from some common procedures that can make a big splash! Root Coverage Grafting You’ve most likely heard the […]

  • Are Electric Toothbrushes Better Than Manual?

    Even though dentists tell us that we should all be brushing twice a day for at least 2-3 minutes each time, the average person actually only brushes between 45-70 seconds per day, according to the Academy of General Dentistry. Bacteria left behind on your teeth can increase your risk for cavities, gingivitis, and periodontitis, and even more […]

  • Is Your Mouth Trying To Tell You Something?

    We talk a lot about gum health on here, because we’re in the business of keeping your gums healthy. Gum disease is no joke, and unchecked it can wreak havoc on your teeth. But what else are your gums telling you about your health? Healthy gums will be light to medium pink in color, will […]

  • Chronic Gum Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Dental health professionals have long understood the key role that inflammation plays in periodontal health. They recognize similarities between the inflammatory process in periodontal disease and that of other chronic inflammatory diseases. Chronic periodontitis, a leading cause of tooth loss, is also associated with increases in markers of systemic inflammation throughout the body. But new […]

  • Estrogen Therapy Can Lead To Healthier Gums

    Many women take estrogen therapy for relief of menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis, but new research shows that the treatment may also lower their risk of gum disease.  Menopausal symptoms, caused by lower levels of estrogen, and osteoporosis, caused by aging, menopause, and lack of Vitamin D and calcium, are often treated with estrogen therapy. Now a new study […]

  • Your Anti-Inflammatory Diet May Help Save Your Teeth

    When the human body encounters stress, infection, germs, injury, or toxins, it responds by activating proteins meant to protect cells and tissues.  In a healthy body, the inflammation caused by this process serves to heal the body. But if the immune system starts to overreact, that inflammation can become chronic and lead to serious health […]

  • The Uncomfortable Truths About Sugar

    You may be surprised to learn that dental disease is the most common chronic non-infectious disease in both industrial and most low income countries. It affects nearly 4 billion people, and although largely preventable, still remains a prevalent public health concern. And by far the most important dietary factor in the development of poor oral health […]